There are many things that

There are many things that is well known for, including martinis, a brassy theme song and an almost unbelievable amount of success with wooing the ladies.

But what makes the fictional spy truly iconic is his vast array of high-tech, and occasionally absurd, gadgetry. 

The first Bond novel, ‘Casino Royale’, was published in 1952, but Ian Fleming’s character didn’t become properly associated with gizmos until he hit the screens a decade later.

To celebrate 60 years since the first film premiered on October 5 1962, MailOnline takes a look at some of the Bond technologies that once seemed far-fetched, but now exist in real life. 

This includes underwater cars, such as that featured in The Spy Who Loved Me, jet packs like the one in 1965’s Thunderball, and bionic hands like those used by the eponymous villain In Dr.No. 

To celebrate 60 years since the first film premiered on October 5 1962, MailOnline takes a look at some of the Bond technologies that once seemed far-fetched, but now exist in real life.

To celebrate 60 years since the first film premiered on October 5 1962, canlı poker siteleri MailOnline takes a look at some of the Bond technologies that once seemed far-fetched, but now exist in real life.

From Sean Connery's (pictured) first appearance as 007 in 1962, to Daniel Craig's final Bond performance last year, the character has always had a piece of tech to help him save the day

To celebrate 60 years since Dr. No premiered, MailOnline takes a look at the Bond technologies that once seemed far-fetched, but now exist in real life

From Sean Connery’s (left) first appearance as 007 in 1962, to Daniel Craig’s (right) final Bond performance last year, the character has always had a piece of tech to help him save the day

Underwater car 

In The Spy Who Loved Me, the 1977 flick starring Roger Moore, Bond drives his Lotus Esprit Turbo off a dock and into the sea to escape the villain.

But, canlı poker siteleri just when you think the hero is done for, the vehicle’s wheels are tucked away while fins pop out, and it turns into a submarine that can whizz through the water.

Inspired by the film, Swiss car designer Frank M.Rinderknecht decided to bring the invention into reality.

In , he unveiled the sQuba – an amphibious vehicle that appears to ‘fly’ underwater based on a Lotus Elise.

It is an open-topped vehicle, as Mr Rinderknecht realised it would be too difficult to make it water-tight, which will float on the water’s surface if driven onto it.

In The Spy Who Loved Me, the 1977 flick starring Roger Moore, Bond drives his Lotus Esprit Turbo off a dock and into the sea to escape the villain

But, just when you think the hero is done for, the vehicle's wheels are tucked away while fins pop out, and it turns into a submarine that can whizz through the water

In The Spy Who Loved Me, the 1977 flick starring Roger Moore, Bond drives his Lotus Esprit Turbo off a dock and canlı poker siteleri into the sea to escape the villain. But, just when you think the hero is done for, the vehicle’s wheels are tucked away while fins pop out, and it turns into a submarine that can whizz through the water

The car can then be driven as a boat, powered by two propellers positioned either side of the rear number plate.

But if a door is opened, the car begins to dive, so the operator and any passenger would need to be wearing scuba gear rather than a three-piece suit.

At depths of up to 30 metres, one of its three battery-powered engines sucks in water through the car’s front grille and pushes it out of its two side jet vents.

It is these two jets, mounted on swivelling heads, which manoeuvre the car up, down, left and right.

At the time, it cost around £750,000 to build by Mr Rinderknecht’s company Rinspeed, which normally specialises in restoring and modifying classic cars.  

In 2008 , Swiss car designer Frank M. Rinderknecht unveiled the sQuba - an amphibious vehicle that appears to 'fly' underwater based on a Lotus Elise

In 2008 , Swiss car designer Frank M.Rinderknecht unveiled the sQuba – an amphibious vehicle that appears to ‘fly’ underwater based on a Lotus Elise

If a door is opened, the open-topped car begins to dive, so the operator and any passenger would need to be wearing scuba gear rather than a three-piece suit

If a door is opened, the open-topped car begins to dive, so the operator and any passenger would need to be wearing scuba gear rather than a three-piece suit

At the time, the sQuba cost around £750,000 to be built by Mr Rinderknecht's company Rinspeed, which normally specialises in restoring and modifying classic cars.

At the time, the sQuba cost around £750,000 to be built by Mr Rinderknecht’s company Rinspeed, which normally specialises in restoring and modifying classic cars.

<div class="art-ins mol-factbox sciencetech halfRHS" data-version="2" id="mol-a09337f0-43f3-11ed-8f28-0de0a719bfe0" website Bond gadgets that exist in real life – as franchise turns 60

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